Articles, tips and tutorials about web design, CSS, usability and other web design-related topics.

1. Get into the habit of using a CSS Reset
How many times over and over have you coded your css and testing the code on Firefox and Chrome it looks fantastic and to your surprise IE looks like crap. Something that definitely comes in handy is the CSS Reset.
It just resets all margins,  paddings, sizes etc. and it simplifies knowing that you are working from a clean slate.
You never edit the Reset.css because it must always be the same.

Some important factors when including the Reset css to your html.

-Always load the reset css before your original site css.
-Never edit the reset css, if you edit it, then it has no use of being a reset css.

<link rel=”stylesheet” href=”reset.css” />
<link rel=”stylesheet” href=”site.css” /> 



2. Adding comments to your code is very helpful
Have you ever come across a piece of code and had absolutely no idea what it does or for what it is.
Well if the coder didn’t add comments then that’s just unlucky.

When coding, make it a habit to add comments, so when you are someone else works on the code, they’ll have a fair idea of what the code is for.

/* This is a comment for this code section */
.box {
         background: #000;
         color: #999;
}

3. Keeping your code clean
Having clean code is not only a art, but it also makes your code look good.

When you have a class that only requires property, then keep everything on one line.
If you have a class that contains more than one property, split it up onto multiple lines.

It’ll look cleaner and faster to read.

.class { text-align: left; }

.class2 {
            background: #000;
            color: #999;
            width: 600px;
}

Part 2 Coming Soon…

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1. Get into the habit of using a CSS Reset
How many times over and over have you coded your css and testing the code on Firefox and Chrome it looks fantastic and to your surprise IE looks like crap. Something that definitely comes in handy is the CSS Reset.
It just resets all margins,  paddings, sizes etc. and it simplifies knowing that you are working from a clean slate.
You never edit the Reset.css because it must always be the same.

Some important factors when including the Reset css to your html.

-Always load the reset css before your original site css.
-Never edit the reset css, if you edit it, then it has no use of being a reset css.

<link rel=”stylesheet” href=”reset.css” />
<link rel=”stylesheet” href=”site.css” />



2. Adding comments to your code is very helpful
Have you ever come across a piece of code and had absolutely no idea what it does or for what it is.
Well if the coder didn’t add comments then that’s just unlucky.

When coding, make it a habit to add comments, so when you are someone else works on the code, they’ll have a fair idea of what the code is for.

/* This is a comment for this code section */
.box {
background: #000;
color: #999;
}

3. Keeping your code clean
Having clean code is not only a art, but it also makes your code look good.

When you have a class that only requires property, then keep everything on one line.
If you have a class that contains more than one property, split it up onto multiple lines.

It’ll look cleaner and faster to read.

.class { text-align: left; }

.class2 {
background: #000;
color: #999;
width: 600px;
}

Go To Part 2

What a shock to me coming to find that Steve Jobs the Apple Genius is dead.

Read the full article here

My favourite comparison chart between Web Designers & Web Developers.

I like to think that I am a good combination of the two.

Google Gravity!

Have you checked out Google Gravity yet?

http://mrdoob.com/92/Google_Gravity

This guy is a very talented front end developer!

Windows 8’s Start Menu

It’s not the most detailed look, but Tom’s Hardware noticed a cameo of the newest StartMenu in a Windows 8 video demo. It looks… pretty bare. Stark white-on-black text, very few buttons, and, importantly, where are the programs?



Whereas Windows 7’s Start Menu offers a multitude of ways to get at your software—favorites, search, a giant list of applications—this Windows Phone 7-inspired Start Menu has none of that. Just a search box. Unless we’re missing something from this screenshot, which is entirely possible, this looks like a pickle. Are we meant to search for whatever we want to use, as we might via OS X’s Spotlight? Are there context-specific buttons that spring up? With Microsoft revealing more and more about their next titanic OS, we’llprobably find out soon.